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Child custody options in Maryland

On Behalf of | Sep 30, 2021 | Child Custody

One of the hardest things about divorce is figuring out what to do with one’s children. Child custody is often a contentious topic because many parents cannot agree on what living arrangements would best benefit their children. Thankfully, there are several custody options out there and available to Maryland parents so they can create a custody plan that fits their family’s unique needs.  

Custody basics 

Generally, there are two types of custody plans offered, which are sole and joint. With a sole custody plan, one parent is granted full custody of the children, and the other may be given visitation time. With a joint custody arrangement, both parents are granted time with the children, with the goal of making it as close to a 50/50 split as possible. Joint custody is the arrangement of choice these days unless there is a solid reason to deny custody to one parent.  

Joint custody plans are flexible 

While the goal may be to split parenting time as evenly as possible, the truth is parents can work out whatever agreement they feel is best or fits their family’s needs. A few examples of possible custody arrangements include one parent has kids during the week and the other on the weekends; one has custody during the school year and the other during the summer. Parents could trade off weeks or months. They could also include virtual visitation, so either parent has the right to contact the children during their time away from them. As long as parents are willing to work together to create a custom custody plan, the possibilities are endless.  

What if parents cannot agree to a plan? 

In this case, the courts may get involved. Both parents will have the opportunity to share their thoughts on the matter, and a judge will get the final say. While not ideal, it is necessary in some cases to go this route.  

Parents in Maryland can turn to legal counsel for assistance addressing child custody matters without having to go to court. If negotiating agreeable terms fails to produce acceptable results, one’s attorney can help one fight things out in court. In the end, the custody arrangement believed to benefit the children’s best interests can be achieved.